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DEBII Semnar2 Thursday by Dr Michael L. Brodie on "Data Integration at Scale: From Relational Integration to InformationEcosystems"?


Seminar II

Data Integration at Scale: From Relational Integration to Information Ecosystems

Presenter

Dr Michael L. Brodie
Date: Thursday, 29th April 2010
Time: 9:30 am - 11:30 am
Location: “Council Chambers” Building 100, Curtin University, Bentley
RSVP by Tuesday 29th April 2010 essential for catering purposes

 

Presentation Outline

Like much of computing, distributed computing emerged as a computational paradigm for network-based applications such as telecommunications, computing and sensor networks, in 1960s and 1970s operating systems and computing architectures applied. In this first stage of computing, Computer Science 1.0, distributed computing was technology driven. The second stage of computing, Computer Science 2.0, is characterised be qualitatively new infrastructure and technologies, including service-orientation, cloud computing, the web, and mobility, that have contributed to quantitative changes in data and transaction volumes, due in part to the unbelievable explosion of applications. More importantly, Computer Science 2.0 marks a shift from a focus on technology to a focus on problem solving, which in turn marks the growing maturity of the relatively young science of computing. While distributed computing was driven by technology in Computer Science 1.0, it will be driven by problem solving and applications in Computer Science 2.0.

Since human activity – scientific, industrial, business, social - is distributed across the globe, it is likely that most applications and problem solving is correspondingly, hence naturally, distributed. The trend to computing support for naturally distributed human activity and problem solving can be seen in the unimaginable growth of the Web, and of mobility, both of which are unleashing natural human and economic forces. For example, in just over two years, over 50,000 applications have emerged for the Apple iPhone leading one to imagine, that in reality, the world is far more distributed than our centralised computing paradigm had led us to believe. Hence, in Computer Science 2.0 there will be an explosion of distributed computing that was only hinted at by the phenomenon of the Web.
Data integration, one of the limiting factors of Computer Science 1.0, is a sine qua non for Computer Science 2.0 in which most computing will be distributed thus involving integration or interoperation in almost every task. Data integration is critical to all distributed computing from communications and protocol mappings all the way up to distributed scientific and industrial applications that share and exchange data at scale – in both the numbers and size of data sources. This talk examines the nature of data integration and the challenges of industrial-scale data integration in the largely pre-web Computer Science 1.0, and speculates on the corresponding challenges at web-scale in a distributed world supported by the largely distributed Computer Science 2.0.
Data integration, one of the limiting factors of Computer Science 1.0, is a sine qua non for Computer Science 2.0 in which most computing will be distributed thus involving integration or interoperation in almost every task. Data integration is critical to all distributed computing from communications and protocol mappings all the way up to distributed scientific and industrial applications that share and exchange data at scale – in both the numbers and size of data sources.
This talk examines the nature of data integration and the challenges of industrial-scale data integration in the largely pre-web Computer Science 1.0, and speculates on the corresponding challenges at web-scale in a distributed world supported by the largely distributed Computer Science 2.0.

Biography of the speaker

Dr Michael L. Brodie is Chief Scientist of Verizon Services Operations in Verizon Communications, one of the world's leading providers of communications services. Dr Brodie works on large-scale strategic Information Technology opportunities and challenges to deliver business value from advanced and emerging technologies and practices. He is concerned with the 'Big Picture', core technologies, and integration within a large scale, operational telecommunications environment.
Dr Brodie holds a PhD in Databases from the University of Toronto and has active interests in the semantic technologies, next generation web, SOA, and other advanced technologies to address secure, interoperable web-scale information systems, databases, infrastructure, and application architectures. Dr Brodie has authored over 150 books, chapters, and articles and has presented over 150 keynotes or invited lectures in over 30 countries.
Dr Brodie is an Adjunct Professor, National University of Ireland , Galway (2006-present). He is an Adjunct Research Fellow, Digital Ecosystems and Business Intelligence Institute (DEBII) at Curtin University of Technology , Perth, Australia (January 2009-present). He chairs three Advisory Boards – Semantic Technology Institutes International , Vienna, Austria (January 2007 – present); Digital Enterprise Research Institute , National University of Ireland (2003-present); Semantic Technology Institute , Innsbrück , Austria (2003-present); Web Science Champion for the Web Science Research Initiative (WSRI) , and is a member of several advisory boards - The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics (2007 – present); School of Computer and Communication Sciences, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland (2001 – present); European Union’s Information Society Technologies 5th, 6th, and 7th Framework Programmes (2003-present); several European and Asian research projects; editorial board of several research journals; past Board member of research foundations including the VLDB (Very Large Databases) Endowment (1992 - 2004) and Client Advisory Board, Forrester Research, Inc. (2006-2008) and was a member of the United States of America National Academies Committee on Technical and Privacy Dimensions of Information for Terrorism Prevention and other National Goals , co-chaired by Dr Charles Vest, president of the National Academy of Engineering and Dr William Perry, former Secretary of Defense, and commissioned by the Department of Homeland Security and the National Science Foundation.
 

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